Monthly Archives

dezembro 2014

How to Make your First Electric Car

By | American Spaces, Sala de Aula | No Comments

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When I asked a student what he thought about making his own car, he told me that what he enjoyed the most was showig  everyone “the process he went through [and] the work he put into it.…”

This kid for sure has many nice toys at home, but it is simply fun when you make something you’re really proud of and other people are interested in it and give you compliments. 

Ideally, you provide the materials and let students tinker and design their own prototypes so that they experience what exploring and making is all about.

If you are a language teacher, you could use this activity to teach superlative and comparative forms of adjectives. Students could create their cars and have a race to practice language. Alternatively, you could start making the car and having a race; Students will probably need to use comparative and superlative forms, and they might start using it (with teachers help) before being formally exposed to it.

What you’ll need

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How to make it

How to Make Your First Wearable Circuit

By | American Spaces, English, Sala de Aula, Sem categoria | No Comments

1235950_10155029437205107_6780974537386070107_n     Making simple wearable circuits is usually a big hit in makerspaces. This simple project might entice young makers and empower them to set creativity free and experiment with different materials. You could ask  children to make masks, monsters, hats, stuffed animals, or let them play freely. 241125_764018243669849_5141205968619777668_o If you are a language teacher, you could carry out one of the following tasks:

  • Ask students to create characters for  storytelling.
  • Have students make their own monsters to practice describing features.
  • Have students create a product and advertize it using modal verbs.

Here is what you will  need for this project. 10264036_774295072642166_1059743152918155543_o

How to Make an Electric Insect

By | American Spaces, English, Sala de Aula, Sem categoria | No Comments

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The idea of making your own circuit is very empowering. There is something magical about being able to make something for the first time, and people who engage in these kind of activites learn much more than circuitry; They learn that they can actually sit down and try to understand how things around us work.

This is a simple maker project that you can offer in your makerspace to reach different learning goals. In a language class, a teacher might propose this task as aprompt for a writing activity, teach narratives, or build a sense of community, for people will need to interact to succeed.

What you will  need:

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Tools; hot glue,soldering iron and solder

 

Procedures

Display all the materials on the table and ask participants to tinker. Do not show them how to do it, but ask questions to trigger thinging.

How to Make a Doodler

By | American Spaces, English, Maker Movement, Sala de Aula | No Comments

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When Glauco Paiva told us to build a doodler, I had no idea where to start. I could see all the materials on the table and some people seemed to know what they were doing. Feeling a little lost at first, I decided to get my hands dirty and started my project. So, every time someone celebrated an accomplishment, I went there and tried to learn from it. Slowly, my own doodler got ready and I could also celebrate and see first-hand how rewarding it is to learn collaboratively. I felt the thrill and excitement of making something functional, and students who experience this feeling might be more involved and attentive. My take on this activity is that there is something very exciting about making something from scratch, and hands-on learning followed by reflective practice might boost and deepen learning. If you are a language teacher just like me, you might be wondering how to use such an activity in your language school or lesson. Here are some suggestions:

What you need

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  • Ask students to write a narrative using past tenses or a sequence paragraph.
  • Teach conditionals.
  • Practice reported speech by reporting the interaction among people during the activity.

 

 

Bibliotecarias do seculo 21

By | American Spaces, Português, Projetos | No Comments

Sexta passada Carla Arena, Fabricio Freire e eu falamos  para as bibliotecárias da casa Thomas Jefferson sobre três principais assuntos que dizem respeito a como transformar ao nossas bibliotecas em espaços dinâmicos de aprendizado. Começamos com a nossa diretora, Lucia santos, sobre a importância de ter novos espaços de aprendizado na nossa instituição. Em seguida, Aida Carvalho contextualizou as mudanças que bibliotecas sofreram através do tempo. Ela falou sobre o que é esperado de uma biblioteca moderna e nos mostrou um TED Talk muito interessante sobre este tema.

 

Eu comecei falando um pouco sobre o movimento do fazer e sem demora passamos para a parte pratica. Participantes aprenderam juntos a fazer um circuito de LED e iluminaram um cartão natalino. A experiência foi muito poderosa, pois todos vivenciaram como é importante trabalhar junto e vencer obstáculos em grupo. Na segunda parte da minha fala falei um pouco sobre a importância de oferecer espaços de aprendizado onde a comunidade pode participar da escolha de atividades. Falamos das diversas atividades oferecidas nos Makerspaces mundo afora. Para encerrar, fizemos uma sessão de ‘Design Thinking’ e todos pensaram em propostas de atividades para o próximo ano.

Carla Arena falou sobre agregadores de conteúdo e de como os espaços de aprendizado devem ser espaços que incentivam e surpreendem; Fabricio encerrou o dia com conceitos de design seguido de parte pratica onde as pessoas fizeram convites usando o aplicativo Phoster para melhoras a comunicação visual da biblioteca. Se você se interessa pelos tópicos e deseja aprender mais, siga o site e entre em contato conosco.

How to Make a LED Powered Card

By | Sem categoria | No Comments

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The idea of making your own circuit is very empowering. There is something magical about being able to make something for the first time, and people who engage in these kind of activites learn much more than circuitry. They learn that they can actually sit down and try to understand how things around us work.

This is a simple maker project that you can offer in your makerspace to reach different learning goals. In a language class, a teacher might propose this task as a follow up for a writing activity, teach narratives, or build a sense of community, for people will need to interact to succeed.

What you will  need:

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Procedure :

Show a card and go over the process briefly. Make sure you tell participants that they will NOT follow instructions because the idea is to make and learn with their peers. Let students tinker and help each other. If someone gets stuck you might ask questions like:Look at this card. Where does the power come from? Which side is the negative?

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Tutorial

Be a Maker Kid

By | English, Maker Movement | No Comments

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With his right hand, my 11-year-old son presses the red-hot soldering iron against the tiny motor. With his left hand, he guides a thin, tin wire until it’s pressing against both the motor and the tip of the iron.

As tin begins to melt, there is some smoke, and a metallic smell drifts back to where I am standing behind him and all the other kids in the room. I have to confess that I get a bit nervous, but I am at ease because I can feel the thrill students get from the act of making something.

These children live in a world in which the objects around us are complex. We have gadgets in our pockets, but we do not have a clue about how they work. Kids buy toys and toss them aside when they break. And, not many parents encourage tinkering and opening things up. To help students slow down and lead them to a very different way of thinking about the world, we decided to run a toy making workshop and started a campaign called Be a Maker Kid  at Casa Thomas Jefferson this year.

The workshop is part of a much larger phenomenon called the Maker Movement. The Maker Movement has grown into a global community of tinkerers, programmers and designers joined by the simple satisfaction they get from making stuff and sharing what they create. The goal is to teach kids a wide range of digital and analog skills: computer programming, 3-D printing, and sewing and drawing.

Beyond the skills they learn, kids learn an important lesson: that the act of creating something can be incredibly educational and deeply gratifying in a way that buying something off the shelf never will be.

We are committed to sharing everything we learn about the maker movement, so if you are interested in running a similar workshop in your institution. read the tips below.

Advertise the event in your social media and around school with interesting posters.

Give a ticket to each student who donates a broken toy.

Send an invitation

Choose a project your students might enjoy (see some examples below)

Electric car – Electric insect – Doodler – LED powered card

Involve school staff for the tinkering part

Have lots of fun, and record your students’ suggestions and what they learned with the activity.